Android locator f4f wildcat

 

Beginning with API Level 8, you can allow your application to be installed on the external storage (for example, the device's SD card). This is an optional feature you can declare for your application with the android:installLocation manifest attribute. If you do not declare this attribute, your application will be installed on the internal storage only and it cannot be moved to the external storage.

To allow the system to install your application on the external storage, modify your manifest file to include the android:installLocation attribute in the <manifest> element, with a value of either " preferExternal " or " auto ". For example:

If you declare " preferExternal ", you request that your application be installed on the external storage, but the system does not guarantee that your application will be installed on the external storage. If the external storage is full, the system will install it on the internal storage. The user can also move your application between the two locations.

Android locator f4f wildcat

public class Location
extends Object implements Parcelable

A data class representing a geographic location. A location can consist of a latitude, longitude, timestamp, and other information such as bearing, altitude and velocity. All locations generated by the LocationManager are guaranteed to have a valid latitude, longitude, and timestamp (both UTC time and elapsed real-time since boot), all other parameters are optional.

Constant used to specify formatting of a latitude or longitude in the form "[+-]DDD:MM.MMMMM" where D indicates degrees and M indicates minutes of arc (1 minute = 1/60th of a degree).

Beginning with API Level 8, you can allow your application to be installed on the external storage (for example, the device's SD card). This is an optional feature you can declare for your application with the android:installLocation manifest attribute. If you do not declare this attribute, your application will be installed on the internal storage only and it cannot be moved to the external storage.

To allow the system to install your application on the external storage, modify your manifest file to include the android:installLocation attribute in the <manifest> element, with a value of either " preferExternal " or " auto ". For example:

If you declare " preferExternal ", you request that your application be installed on the external storage, but the system does not guarantee that your application will be installed on the external storage. If the external storage is full, the system will install it on the internal storage. The user can also move your application between the two locations.

Could you list all possible directories where Android apps may store data, providing description what kind of data are stored in each directory?

All apps (root or not) have a default data directory, which is /data/data/<package_name> . By default, the apps databases, settings, and all other data go here. If an app expects huge amounts of data to be stored, or for other reasons wants to "be nice to internal storage", there's a corresponding directory on the SDCard ( Android/data/<package_name> ).

Apart from that, all apps can store data anywhere on the SDCard, as there are no restrictions -- and many apps do so. They can use directory names freely (and they again do), which is what often makes it hard to decide what all that "junk" on the card is intended for, and what of it can be deleted.

Most Android devices allow to determine the current geo location. This can be done via a GPS (Global Positioning System) module, via cell tower triangulation and via wifi networks.

Now you can access the last known location. The fuse location provider provides a new simple API. The following is an example activity which uses it.

The Geocoder class allows to determine the geo-coordinates (longitude, laditude) for a given address and possible addresses for given geo-coordinates.

If your app needs to request location or receive permission updates, the device needs to enable the appropriate system settings, such as GPS or Wi-Fi scanning. Rather than directly enabling services such as the device's GPS, your app specifies the required level of accuracy/power consumption and desired update interval, and the device automatically makes the appropriate changes to system settings. These settings are defined by the LocationRequest data object.

This lesson shows you how to use the Settings API to check which settings are enabled, and present the Location Settings dialog for the user to update their settings with a single tap.

In order to use the location services provided by Google Play Services and the fused location provider, connect your app using the Google API Client , then check the current location settings and prompt the user to enable the required settings if needed. For details on connecting with the Google API client, see Getting the Last Known Location .