Android locator 0oo

 

Knowing a user’s location in an Android app can be extremely useful. Users take their devices everywhere and are constantly using them on the go, and as developers we can capitalize on that by providing a more contextual experience based on their current location.

Accessing the current location of an Android device is easier than ever, but it can still be a little tricky, especially for the first time. What follows is a guide on the very basics of retrieving a user’s current location and displaying it with a marker on a map. The project files for this project are available on GitHub , but follow along and in a few minutes we’ll build a super simple location finder!

This is a somewhat complex topic in Android, but these step-by-step guidelines should explain everything you need. If you would like to learn more about the fundamentals of Android programming that lead up to this, please check out my Android Development Track on Treehouse.

Android locator 0oo

Not everyone knows what Google knows about us , but we all know that our Android devices love tracking us. Don’t get me wrong, giving Google access to your location has actually quite a lot of benefits:

However, you might still want to disable location tracking on your Android device for your own reasons. It’s very simple to do, so let me show you how it goes:

In the Google Settings app select “Location” to get to Android’s location settings (also accessible via Settings > Location). You should now see this screen:

Knowing a user’s location in an Android app can be extremely useful. Users take their devices everywhere and are constantly using them on the go, and as developers we can capitalize on that by providing a more contextual experience based on their current location.

Accessing the current location of an Android device is easier than ever, but it can still be a little tricky, especially for the first time. What follows is a guide on the very basics of retrieving a user’s current location and displaying it with a marker on a map. The project files for this project are available on GitHub , but follow along and in a few minutes we’ll build a super simple location finder!

This is a somewhat complex topic in Android, but these step-by-step guidelines should explain everything you need. If you would like to learn more about the fundamentals of Android programming that lead up to this, please check out my Android Development Track on Treehouse.

So you’ve lost your Android phone or had it stolen and you’re kind of in panic mode, eh? As important as smartphones have become in our everyday lives, misplacing them is one of the most scary things that can happen, but we’re here to help.

Most people think it’s only about the burden of having to replace the phone, which can cost anywhere from $100 to $700 depending on whether you’ve got insurance. But the reality is that your privacy and security are at risk.

Your phone holds tons of info about not only you, but those who are close to you. Someone who gets their hands on your phone may have access to sensitive information such as racy pictures you don’t intend for anyone else to see, phone numbers and addresses, and even financial info. You also might be subject to losing precious memories that simply can’t be replaced.