Government spying through cell phone

 

Despite initial plans to accept only one of an Independence class and one of a Freedom that make up the LCS lot, the USN has requested that Congress order ten additional ships in each category for a total 12 ships.

The USS Gabrielle Giffords is an LCS-2 class series warship and was proposed by General Dynamics and Australian based ship builder, Austal USA. The original contract was to produce a proposed fleet of as many as 55 of these small multipurpose naval warships to operate in the littoral zone .

The littoral zone is that part of a sea, lake or river that is close to the shore.   Close to shore means that LCSs may in reality be intended to patrol both the east and west coasts of this nation and to navigable rivers.   This would be evident if in a near future time Martial Law replaces what little freedoms we have left.   In this case, this would be with regard to our liberal freedoms to travel here as well as abroad.

Government spying through cell phone

A school sysadmin explains how he "cranks down the lid" on privacy settings to protect students. https://www.eff.org/deeplinks...

At the center of the Venn diagram of lawyers and activists is this security and privacy training in NYC next week: https://www.facebook.com/even...

Got 36 seconds? Listen to EFF's @agcrocker explain in court how national security letters are unconstitutional https://youtu.be/3y0b3T7t4lw

Despite initial plans to accept only one of an Independence class and one of a Freedom that make up the LCS lot, the USN has requested that Congress order ten additional ships in each category for a total 12 ships.

The USS Gabrielle Giffords is an LCS-2 class series warship and was proposed by General Dynamics and Australian based ship builder, Austal USA. The original contract was to produce a proposed fleet of as many as 55 of these small multipurpose naval warships to operate in the littoral zone .

The littoral zone is that part of a sea, lake or river that is close to the shore.   Close to shore means that LCSs may in reality be intended to patrol both the east and west coasts of this nation and to navigable rivers.   This would be evident if in a near future time Martial Law replaces what little freedoms we have left.   In this case, this would be with regard to our liberal freedoms to travel here as well as abroad.

Privacy today faces growing threats from a growing surveillance apparatus that is often justified in the name of national security. Numerous government agencies—including the National Security Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Homeland Security, and state and local law enforcement agencies—intrude upon the private communications of innocent citizens, amass vast databases of who we call and when, and catalog “suspicious activities” based on the vaguest standards.

The government’s collection of this sensitive information is itself an invasion of privacy. But its use of this data is also rife with abuse. Innocuous data is fed into bloated watchlists, with severe consequences—innocent individuals have found themselves unable to board planes, barred from certain types of jobs, shut out of their bank accounts, and repeatedly questioned by authorities. Once information is in the government’s hands, it can be shared widely and retained for years, and the rules about access and use can be changed entirely in secret without the public ever knowing.

Our Constitution and democratic system demand that the government be transparent and accountable to the people, not the other way around. History has shown that powerful, secret surveillance tools will almost certainly be abused for political ends and turned disproportionately on disfavored minorities.

There have been a lot of news stories about NSA surveillance programs following the leaks of secret documents by Edward Snowden. But it seems the more we read, the less clear things are. We've put together a detailed snapshot of what's known and what's been reported where.

We don’t know all of the different types of information the NSA collects, but several secret collection programs have been revealed:

A record of most calls made in the U.S. , including the telephone number of the phones making and receiving the call, and how long the call lasted. This information is known as “metadata” and doesn’t include a recording of the actual call (but see below). This program was revealed through a leaked secret court order instructing Verizon to turn over all such information on a daily basis. Other phone companies, including AT&T and Sprint , also reportedly give their records to the NSA on a continual basis. All together, this is several billion calls per day.